Difference between revisions of "Alluvial fan"

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An '''alluvial fan''' is the dirt, sand, gravel, rocks, and boulders which a mountain stream emerging from a canyon deposits at the mouth of the canyon. The alluvial fan [[Crestone]] is on is extends for about 1 mile south and west from the mouth of [[North Crestone Canyon]].
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An '''alluvial fan''' is the dirt, sand, gravel, rocks, and boulders which a mountain [[stream]] emerging from a canyon deposits at the mouth of the canyon. The alluvial fan [[Crestone]] is on extends for about 1 mile south and west from the mouth of [[North Crestone Canyon]]. [[Burnt Gulch]], a intermittent stream east of Crestone, has also contributed material to the alluvial fan.
  
During normal stream flow Crestone Creek flows in a confined bed, but during [[flash flood]]s it may escape its bed and establish a new course. It is hard for substantial tropical moisture to enter the San Luis Valley, but if unusual conditions exist it can and a substantial flood can occur. This can result in houses being washed away a new course being established for the creek.
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During normal stream flow Crestone Creek flows in a confined bed, but during [[flash flood]]s it may escape its bed and establish a new course. It is hard for substantial tropical moisture to enter the San Luis Valley, but if unusual conditions exist it can and a substantial flood can occur. This can result in houses being washed away and a new course being established for the creek.
  
 
==Notes and references==
 
==Notes and references==

Latest revision as of 00:36, 30 May 2017

An alluvial fan is the dirt, sand, gravel, rocks, and boulders which a mountain stream emerging from a canyon deposits at the mouth of the canyon. The alluvial fan Crestone is on extends for about 1 mile south and west from the mouth of North Crestone Canyon. Burnt Gulch, a intermittent stream east of Crestone, has also contributed material to the alluvial fan.

During normal stream flow Crestone Creek flows in a confined bed, but during flash floods it may escape its bed and establish a new course. It is hard for substantial tropical moisture to enter the San Luis Valley, but if unusual conditions exist it can and a substantial flood can occur. This can result in houses being washed away and a new course being established for the creek.

Notes and references

External links and further reading