Difference between revisions of "Internet monopolies"

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Firms such as Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon, and Microsoft appear to be [[monopoly|monopolies]] but their market domination is dependent on mass adoption and use of their products and services, essentially, they are brands with a substantial public following. Netscape, Yahoo, AOL, and MySpace are examples of what occurs when such a firm loses favor. That is the rational basis behind the extreme aggressiveness of such firms;<ref name = NYT81616 >[http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/17/business/dealbook/expect-little-antitrust-challenge-to-walmarts-bid-for-jet-com.html "Tech Giants Gobble Start-Ups in an Antitrust Blind Spot'] article by Steven Davidoff Solomon in ''The New York Times'' August 16, 2016</ref> they are vulnerable to replacement by either other private firms or by public providers.
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Firms such as Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon, and Microsoft appear to be [[monopoly|monopolies]] but their market domination is dependent on mass adoption and use of their products and services, essentially, they are brands with a substantial public following. Netscape, Yahoo, AOL, and MySpace are examples of what occurs when such a firm loses favor. That is the rational basis behind the extreme aggressiveness of such firms;<ref name = NYT81616 >[http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/17/business/dealbook/expect-little-antitrust-challenge-to-walmarts-bid-for-jet-com.html "Tech Giants Gobble Start-Ups in an Antitrust Blind Spot'] article by Steven Davidoff Solomon in ''The New York Times'' August 16, 2016</ref> they are vulnerable to replacement by either other private firms or by [[social provider]]s.
  
 
==Notes and references==
 
==Notes and references==

Latest revision as of 03:16, 17 August 2016

Firms such as Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon, and Microsoft appear to be monopolies but their market domination is dependent on mass adoption and use of their products and services, essentially, they are brands with a substantial public following. Netscape, Yahoo, AOL, and MySpace are examples of what occurs when such a firm loses favor. That is the rational basis behind the extreme aggressiveness of such firms;[1] they are vulnerable to replacement by either other private firms or by social providers.

Notes and references

  1. "Tech Giants Gobble Start-Ups in an Antitrust Blind Spot' article by Steven Davidoff Solomon in The New York Times August 16, 2016