National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

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The National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam came into existence in May 1967, as the new name of what had previously been called the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam. Due to the committee's long name, which often changed, many people referred to the committee as the "Mobe". The Mobe was a coalition of many groups across the United States.

The first major action that the newly renamed Mobe took was preparation for a march on the Pentagon. This took place on October 21, 1967. A rally took place at the Lincoln Memorial where the crowd listened to speakers, then part of the crowd marched to "confront the warmakers" at the Pentagon.

The Mobe continued to help organize anti-war events. It helped organize demonstrations at the Democratic National Convention held in Chicago in August 1968. Since there were no anti-war candidates in the November 1968 presidential elections, the Mobe called for an election strike. On the day of Nixon's inauguration as president on January 20, 1969, the Mobe held a counter-inaugural.

Following the counter-inaugural, the Mobe began to come apart. In July 1969, representatives of groups from around the country gathered at a Cleveland Area Peace Action Council conference and agreed to reorganize the Mobe. The new Mobe was officially called the New Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam.


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