Difference between revisions of "Bill McAdoo"

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'''Bill McAdoo''' is an [[African-American]] singer who recorded two albums on Folkways Records in the 1960s, ''Bill McAdoo Sings with Guitar'', Bill McAdoo and Pete Seeger FW02448 / FA 2448. [[Pete Seeger]] provided banjo accompaniment. He is from Detroit and attended the University of Michigan. He was 23 in 1960. ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'', Bill McAdoo FW02449 / FA 2449 was issued in 1961. He was part of the [[Greenwich Village]] folk scene in the early 1960s. He is mentioned in a history of the [[Progressive Labor Party]] on [[Marxist.org]], "Bill McAdoo, who organized the Harlem Defense Committee for PLM, in the fall spoke in San Francisco..." [1964].<ref name = 5retreats >[https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/1960-1970/5retreats/chapter1.htm "The Five Retreats: A History of the Failure of the Progressive Labor Party"] Jim Dann and Hari Dillon Marxist.org</ref>
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'''Bill McAdoo''' is an [[African-American]] singer who recorded two albums on Folkways Records in the 1960s, ''Bill McAdoo Sings with Guitar'', Bill McAdoo and Pete Seeger FW02448 / FA 2448. [[Pete Seeger]] provided banjo accompaniment. He is from Detroit and attended the University of Michigan. He was 23 in 1960. ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'', Bill McAdoo FW02449 / FA 2449 was issued in 1961. He was part of the [[Greenwich Village]] folk scene in the early 1960s.
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McAdoo is mentioned in a history of the [[Progressive Labor Party]] on [[Marxist.org]], "Bill McAdoo, who organized the Harlem Defense Committee for PLM, in the fall spoke in San Francisco..." [1964]. "The 1966 UCLA teach-in, which had heard a range of speakers from conservative to radical liberal was electrified when PLP’s Bill MacAdoo bitterly denounced the white liberal mentality, then he openly called for the U.S. Army to mutiny: “Turn your guns on the Generals,” he said to the shocked audience." McAdoo resigned from PL in 1967 when it failed to support his organizing efforts in jail following the Harlem rebellion and began to characterize the [[Black nationalist movement]] as "reactionary nationalism."<ref name = 5retreats >[https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/1960-1970/5retreats/chapter1.htm "The Five Retreats: A History of the Failure of the Progressive Labor Party"] Jim Dann and Hari Dillon Marxist.org</ref>
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
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*[http://www.folkways.si.edu/bill-mcadoo/sings-volume-2/american-folk-struggle-protest/music/album/smithsonian ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'']
 
*[http://www.folkways.si.edu/bill-mcadoo/sings-volume-2/american-folk-struggle-protest/music/album/smithsonian ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'']
 
*[http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/folkways/FW02449.pdf Cover and liner notes ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'']
 
*[http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/folkways/FW02449.pdf Cover and liner notes ''Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II'']
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
  
 
[[Category:African-American singers]]
 
[[Category:African-American singers]]
 
[[Category:American civil rights movement]]
 
[[Category:American civil rights movement]]

Latest revision as of 18:39, 12 December 2016

Bill McAdoo is an African-American singer who recorded two albums on Folkways Records in the 1960s, Bill McAdoo Sings with Guitar, Bill McAdoo and Pete Seeger FW02448 / FA 2448. Pete Seeger provided banjo accompaniment. He is from Detroit and attended the University of Michigan. He was 23 in 1960. Bill McAdoo Sings, Volume II, Bill McAdoo FW02449 / FA 2449 was issued in 1961. He was part of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the early 1960s.

McAdoo is mentioned in a history of the Progressive Labor Party on Marxist.org, "Bill McAdoo, who organized the Harlem Defense Committee for PLM, in the fall spoke in San Francisco..." [1964]. "The 1966 UCLA teach-in, which had heard a range of speakers from conservative to radical liberal was electrified when PLP’s Bill MacAdoo bitterly denounced the white liberal mentality, then he openly called for the U.S. Army to mutiny: “Turn your guns on the Generals,” he said to the shocked audience." McAdoo resigned from PL in 1967 when it failed to support his organizing efforts in jail following the Harlem rebellion and began to characterize the Black nationalist movement as "reactionary nationalism."[1]

External links

References